CKC Breed Standard

Within that world, the Bulldog can be described as a breed of extremes – flat faced, plenty of mass in a compact form with a lumbering appearance. The Breed Standard for the Bulldog is critical for defining the breed. Fully understanding it will you allow you to learn type and will open your eyes to a breed that is actually one of balance, portion, and symmetry. The standard for the Bulldog is an old one, and for the most part has gone unchanged since the late 1800’s. This is a breed full of history, with jobs that included bull baiting, dog fighting, and eventually loving house pets. 

The world is changing and so are attitudes towards brachycephalic or flat faced breeds, including the Bulldog. It is more important now than ever that pure-bred preservation breeders continue to strive to breed for the standard Bulldog. Those who love the breed must support kennel clubs who stand to protect the breeds through their standards. To change the standard would be the same as changing history. To breed for anything besides what is spelled out in the breed standard would be doing the breed a disservice. Preserve. Promote. Protect.
sleepy bulldog

The Breed Standard

Within that world, the Bulldog can be described as a breed of extremes – flat faced, plenty of mass in a compact form with a lumbering appearance. The Breed Standard for the Bulldog is critical for defining the breed. Fully understanding it will you allow you to learn type and will open your eyes to a breed that is actually one of balance, portion, and symmetry. The standard for the Bulldog is an old one, and for the most part has gone unchanged since the late 1800’s. This is a breed full of history, with jobs that included bull baiting, dog fighting, and eventually loving house pets. 

The world is changing and so are attitudes towards brachycephalic or flat faced breeds, including the Bulldog. It is more important now than ever that pure-bred preservation breeders continue to strive to breed for the standard Bulldog. Those who love the breed must support kennel clubs who stand to protect the breeds through their standards. To change the standard would be the same as changing history. To breed for anything besides what is spelled out in the breed standard would be doing the breed a disservice. Preserve. Promote. Protect.

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General Appearance

The perfect Bulldog must be of medium size and smooth coat; with heavy, thick-set, low-swung body, massive short-faced head, wide shoulders and sturdy limbs. The general appearance and attitude should suggest great stability, vigor and strength. The disposition should be equable and kind, resolute and courageous (not vicious or aggressive), and demeanor should be pacific and dignified. These attributes should be countenanced by the expression and behavior.

Head

The skull should be very large, and in circumference, in front of the ears, should measure at least the height of the dog at the shoulders. Viewed from the front, it should appear very high from the corner of the lower jaw to the apex of the skull, and also very broad and square. Viewed at the side, the head should appear very high, and very short from the point of the nose to occiput. The forehead should be flat (not rounded or domed), neither too prominent nor overhanging the face.

Body

The brisket and body should be very capacious, with full sides, well-rounded ribs and very deep from the shoulders down to its lowest part, where it joins the chest. It should be well let down between the shoulders and forelegs, giving the dog a broad, low, short-legged appearance. Chest – The chest should be very broad, deep and full. Underline – The body should be well ribbed up behind with the belly tucked up and not rotund. Back and Loin – The back should be short and strong, very broad at the shoulders and comparatively narrow at the loins.

Forequarters

Shoulders – The shoulders should be muscular, very heavy, widespread and slanting outward, giving stability and great power. Forelegs – The forelegs should be short, very stout, straight and muscular, set wide apart, with well developed calves, presenting a bowed outline, but the bones of the legs should not be curved or bandy, nor the feet brought too close together. Elbows – The elbows should be low and stand well out and loose from the body. Feet – The feet should be moderate in size, compact and firmly set. Toes compact, well split up, with high knuckles and very short stubby nails. The front feet may be straight or slightly out-turned.

Coat

The coat should be straight, short, flat, close, of fine texture, smooth and glossy. (No fringe, feather or curl.) Skin – The skin should be soft and loose, especially at the head, neck and shoulders. Wrinkles and Dewlap – The head and face should be covered with heavy wrinkles, and at the throat, from jaw to chest, there should be two loose pendulous folds, forming the dewlap.

Hindquarters

The hind legs should be strong and muscular and longer than the forelegs, so as to elevate the loins above the shoulders. Hocks should be slightly bent and well let down, so as to give length and strength from the loins to hock. The lower leg should be short, straight and strong, with the stifles turned slightly outward and away from the body. The hocks are thereby made to approach each other, and the hind feet to turn outward.